Blue Angels by Nicholas Veronico

Blue Angels

Blue Angels: 50 Years Of Precision Flight; co-written by Marga Fritze
This book is 17-years old but the Blue Angels still fly the F/A-18 Hornet, which is a testimony to the airworthiness of the F/A-18. The book gives the history of the Blue Angels through the pilots and aircraft of this US Navy Flight Demonstration Team. It is a thin book but it does cover the highs and lows, the broad outline of their history, and details of the men and machines. It’s a good read and one that helps fill a hole caused by the Blue Angels being grounded due to budget constraints and politics. There are some good photos in the book. The Blue Angels are always photogenic, so I did expect better photos. The highlights  of the book were the quotes and stories told by the pilots themselves.

B
119 pages

Contents

     Acknowledgments
     Introduction

1946 F6F-5  Hellcats, The Birth of the Blues: "Get It Up, Get It On, Get It Down"
1946 F8F-1  Bearcats to Panther Jets
1951 F9F-5  Panther, Restarting the Team After Korea
1954 F9F-8, Enter the Cougar
1957 F11F-1 Tiger, The Blue Angels Go Supersonic
1969 F-4J,  Phantoms: Raw Power, Tragic Team Member
1974 A-4F   Skyhawk, Rebuilding the Team with "Good Solid Airmanship and Good Solid Maneuvers"
1986 F/A-18 Hornet Years (1986 to Present), The
     Behind the Scenes with the Blue Angels

     Appendix  I Aircraft Specifications and Bureau Numbers
     Appendix II Roster of Officers, 1946-95
     Index

Photographers:

John M Campbell (Complete History), Harrison Rued, William Larkins, (F11F-1)
Cormier Collection, McDonald Douglas (F-4J, F/A-18)
Karen B Haack (A-4F)
Marga Fritze (F/A-18)

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About craigmaas

I do a little web design work and support a couple web sites and blogs. My primary focus is lighting and energy consulting where I use a number of computer tools to help my customer find ways of saving money and improving their work environment. See my web site for more information: www.effectiveconcepts.net
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