Tag Archives: Baseball

Batboy by Matthew McGough

In 1991, 16 year old Matthew McGough took a long shot and wrote 15 letters to George Steinbrenner and other members of the New York Yankees management.  It paid off big when the following spring, he was sitting in the … Continue reading

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Wait Till Next Year by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Renowned historian Doris Kearns Goodwin writes of her childhood and beloved Brooklyn Dodgers in this charming memoir entitled Wait Till Next Year.  The beauty of this little book, is that it presents a slice of Americana from not only a … Continue reading

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The Art Of Fielding by Chad Harbach

This is the stuff dreams are made of.  A high school prodigy gets scouted by a small Wisconsin college whose baseball team is long on losing seasons.  The prodigy, Henry Skrimshander,  enters the world of Westish College where tradition reigns … Continue reading

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The Brothers K by David James Duncan

“When I consider the odds against me watching baseball on Sabbath (100 to 1?), going fishing on Sabbath (1,000 to 1?), and doing both along with Papa because Everett, Peter, Irwin, Mama and the twins have all vanished at just … Continue reading

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Calico Joe by John Grisham

I’m… still… batting… a… thousand… off… you. Continue reading

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Calico Joe by John Grisham

For years, superstar author John Grisham has wanted to write a novel about baseball.  Unfortunately, the story just never came to him.  Then, a couple of years ago, Grisham read a story about Ray Chapman, a baseball player who was … Continue reading

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The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach

“You told me once that a soul isn’t something a person is born with but something that must be built, by effort and error, study and love. And you did that with more dedication than most, that work of building a soul—not for your own benefit but for the benefit of those who knew you.

Which is partly why your death is so hard for us. It’s hard to accept that a soul like yours, which took a lifetime to build, could cease to exist. It makes us angry, furious at the universe, not to have you here.

But of course your soul does exist, Guert, because you gave of it so unstintingly. It exists in your book, and in this school, and also in each of us. For that we’ll always be grateful.” Owen looked up, lifting the beam of his reading light. It passed over each of them again. He smiled. “And we miss you corporal form, which was also nice.” Continue reading

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